Archive for the ‘Alexander Technique’ Category

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Alexander Technique & the Choral Singer

October 22, 2008
Potted Alexander Technique

F.M. Alexander (1869-1955) was an actor who suffered from recurrent hoarseness and breathing difficulties. Having unsuccessfully tried the medical treatments available at the time, Alexander studied by himself, over a period of seven years, in a three-way system of mirrors to find out what he was doing that caused him to lose his voice.

He noticed a tendency to stiffen his neck and pull his head back and down. This habit initiated a pattern of misdirected effort through his whole body. He eventually developed an approach that involved momentarily pausing and releasing his habitual tension and then ‘directing’ himself into an easier, co-ordinated state.

Alexander went on to teach, using a combination of gentle manual guidance and verbal instruction to give his students a direct experience of using their bodies in a more co-ordinated way.

Alexander and the singer

The singing/Alexander Technique teachers I worked with said nothing about my voice. Instead they said things like, ‘Allow your shoulders to release and widen’;’release the back of your neck’, etc. Over time this gentle approach increased the resonance, range and flexibility of my voice.

most of us accumulate muscular and mental habits which, to some extent, shorten, narrow and twist natural skeletal alignment. These things interfere with easy singing, and changing such habits will, in turn, change your voice.

The way we stand and sit has a profound effect on the way we sing. We become so familiar with our habits which restrict our posture that any attempt to change to a freer state can ‘feel’ wrong and unfamiliar. One of the advantages of doing Alexander Technique with a choir is that any change is reinforced by the immediate feedback of an improved sound.

Take a seat

Is there a conspiracy afoot amongst the designers of institutional furniture to create chairs that are at odds with everything we know about the healthy human structure? The typical rehearsal room posture tends to follow this pattern: the arms feel too heavy to hold up the score, so we rest it on our lap (with one leg crossed over the other) and sag down to peer at it (see below). Then, to turn an already bad situation into a disaster, the choirmaster requires our attention, so we tighten the backs of our necks to look up. At this point we try ‘straightening up’–pulling the shoulders back, raising the breastbone and arching the lower back. This requires considerable effort, creates fatigue and is difficult to sustain over even short periods of time–hardly a conducive state for singing!

Becoming more open

 

Many people do not open their mouths to sing. They open their heads–by tightening the muscles around the base of the skull, lifting the nose in the air and keeping the jaw fixed (see left). This causes excess pressure to bear down on the larynx, ribs and diaphragm and leads to vocal strain. By releasing the muscles that suspend your jaw you can open your mouth more easily.

Look in a mirror – preferably the three-way sort, like an old dressing table mirror. Let your lips be softly together. Think of releasing your jaw muscles, from your temples along the old-fashioned sideburns area (see right). Without tipping your nose either up or down, let your lower set of teeth drop away from your upper set. Open your lips and vocalise an ‘aahh’.

Sitting bones

Place your hands under your buttocks and find two bony knobbles: these are your sitting bones. What happens to your sitting bones:
a) When you slump? (How does this affect your head, neck and body relationship?)
b) When you pull your shoulders back and chest up, military-style?
With your head leading, rock back and forth on your sitting bones until you find the point where they are pointing down directly into the chair. Think of directing your knees away from your sitting bones and slightly away from each other. How does this affect your body as a whole? Now sing!

Arms and eyes

Imagine that you have puppet strings attached to your elbows, wrists and fingers. The puppeteers raise your arms with minimum effort on your part. Repeat this experiment holding the score. Using only your eyes, alternate between looking at the score and looking at an imaginary conductor (below).

Pixels10.gif (810 bytes) 

 

 

 

 

 

End gaining

An Alexander Technique expression for using excess effort to achieve a given end. Think of the poor old sopranos and tenors, noses and shoulders up in the air, trying to achieve their high notes.

In the bass and alto sections chins are compressed into throats as thev strive for that low note. These habits may feel right at the time but the end result is rarely satisfying.

Easy does it

There are singers who make the most demanding roles look and sound effortless. Although we may not all become Pavarottis, this quality of ease is learnable: imagine you have an octave mapped out along your spine and head. The lowest note is on your bottom, then your lower abdomen, upper abdomen, breast-bone, neck, base of skull, forehead and finally the crown of your head. Sing up the octave to your crown; and down to your bottom again.

Many singers squeeze up to ‘end gain’ the high notes and pull down along the front for the low notes (right), so try it the other way round – the highest note at your bottom and the lowest at your crown. This can lead to greater ease and appropriate effort in your singing.

A word about breathing

Associated with the habit of stiffening the neck, singers often suck in what feels like a large chestful of air (watch a choir just about to sing). In doing so they become like an over-inflated balloon and the air rapidly rushes away. If you take care of your posture in the ways outlined above, your breathing will tend to take care of itself. During warm-ups allow time for your breath to return unhurriedly between phrases.

Take five

‘Is there a special Alexander way of feeling calmer when you are in a hurry?’ students often ask. ‘Yes,’ comes my reply, ‘leave home five minutes earlier than usual’.

Take five leisurely minutes to warm up before choir practice. Remember a favourite time and place–an experience in which you had plenty of time and space. Relive what you were seeing, hearing and feeling. Stay with this experience for a little while longer. Now vocalise an ‘aahh’ or sing.

During busy rehearsals it may feel as if there is insufficient time to warm up, but being physically relaxed and mentally alert will pay dividends in choral singing. Current research suggests that people learn faster when they are in a calm and collected state, and one way of preparing for rehearsals and performances is to use the Alexander ‘active resting’ position (below). This gives maximum support to your spine– feet flat on the floor, knees pointing up to the ceiling about shoulder-width apart–alleviating pressure on the lower back.

 

The head-rest (some books will do) encourages release in the muscles that join the back of the neck to the base of your skull. It should be neither too high (or your chin will compress your throat) nor too low (or your chin will stick up in the air). Imagine the four ‘corners’ of your back–head, shoulders and tail bone– spreading and lengthening and widening away from each other and on to the floor. Use the active resting position for ten minutes a day or before rehearsals.

voice-class-alexander-aikido-nlp1

About The Writer

Alan Mars has been a STAT qualified teacher of the Alexander Technique since 1982. He has taught Alexander Technique and voice-work at many leading performing arts institutions including – the Arts Educational Drama School, the Guildhall School of Music and Drama and the Royal College of Music. Alan has taught Alexander Technique based presentation skills to staff from many top public and private companies including Abbey National; General Electric; Sainsbury’s; Lloyds of London; Comet; the Royal Pharmaceutical Society; BNFL; the Probation Service to name but a few. Alan regularly coaches at senior management level. He is the author of a book on presentation skills “Presenter” published by Hodder & Stoughton.

Alan Mars
Alan Mars, Brighton & Hove Alexander Technique,
26 Ventnor Villas, Brighton & Hove, BN3 3DE
Tel: 01273 747 289 or 07930 323 057
Email: alan.mars@yahoo.co.uk  Web: http://www.thetechnique.co.uk/

Related Articles:

Singing, Health & Happiness

 The Lychen Choir – a growing collection of community singing with lyrics and MP3 soundfiles

Choral Links and Resources:

British Choirs on the Net

Gerontius

choralnet.org

Hear the Choirs Sing

Choral Public Domain Library – one of the world’s largest free sheet music sites.

Musica.Net – Virtual Music Choral Library

Choral evensong on BBC radio 3

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The Lychen Choir!

September 11, 2008
Joy to the World & Happy New Year – A message from Rudie the Harp Playing Reindeer (aka Alan Mars)
Soon the hoar old year must leave us,
   Fa la la la la, la la la la.
But the parting must not grieve us
   Fa la la la la, la la la la.
When the new year comes tomorrow
   Fa la la la la, la la la la
Let him find no trace of sorrow
   Fa la la la la, la la la la.

He our pleasures may redouble,
   Fa la la la la, la la la la.
He may bring us store of trouble,
   Fa la la la la, la la la la.
Hope the best and gaily meet him,
   Fa la la la la, la la la la.
With a jovial chorus greet him,
   Fa la la la la, la la la la.

At his birth, he brings us gladness,
   Fa la la la la, la la la la.
Ponder not on future sadness,
   Fa la la la la, la la la la.
Anxious care is now but folly,
   Fa la la la la, la la la la.
Fill the mead-cup, hand the holly,
   Fa la la la la, la la la la.

Lyrics from Mudcat

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Haike recites the Persian Sufi poet Jalaluddin Rumi…   please send both English and German translations!
concert-master-haeke-recites-a-poem-by-rumi1
History and biography of Rumi:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jalal_ad-Din_Muhammad_Rumi
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Glenn introduces the Grand Lychen Concert
glenns-intro-to-the-grand-lychen-concert
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Glenn, Jamie and Alan:
somewhere-over-theover-the-rainbow-some-enchanted-evening-more-beer
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http://thetechnique.co.uk/
      alan.mars@yahoo.co.uk
Links to related singing & Alexander Technique articles
20/10/08 Who is Bob Dylan’s major songwriting influence? What do the Lychen singers and Bob Dylan have in common?
Yes, that’s right… Robert Burns! Our old friend Bob Dylan has cited Scottish poet and songwriter, Robert Burns, as his major influence.
We, the Lychen singers, finished our little concert with the most famous song in the world, Auld Land Syne,  written by Robert Burns. Why is it the most famous song in the world? Because on MIllenium Night, Year 2000, it was sung, nation by nation, all the way across the planet, in a massive, twelve hour Mexican wave. When will that happen again? And, yes, I am totally biased.
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 Scotland – featuring Alan Mars, Harriet Anderson and the ancient Lychen swamp people!
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Auld Lang Syne wav + Auld Lang Syne mp3
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Auld Lang Syne

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne!

Chorus:
For auld lang syne, my jo,
For auld lang syne,
We’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet
For auld lang syne.

And surely you’ll be your pint stoup,
And surely I’ll be mine,
And we’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet
For auld lang syne!

Chorus

We twa hae ran about the braes,
And pou’d the gowans fine,
But we’ve wander’d monie a weary fit
Sin’ auld lang syne.

Chorus

We twa hae paidl’d in the burn
Frae morning sun til dine,
But seas between us braid hae roar’d
Sin’ auld lang syne.

Chorus

And there’s a hand, my trusty fiere,
And gie’s a hand o’ thine,
And we’ll tak a right gude willie waught
For auld lang syne!

Chorus

Meaning of unusual words:
Auld lang syne = Old long since (old time’s sake)
jo = dear
stoup = tankard
gowans = daisies
braid = broad
Gude willie waught = a friendly drink and blether

 

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18/10/08 Jamie bridges the divisions…. Jamie & Glen photo (Jamie on left) .  Belfast and  Dublin . She is the Belle of Belfast City mp3BELLE OF BELFAST CITY / I’LL TELL ME MA

Tell my ma when I go home,

The boys won’t leave the girls alone,

They pulled my hair and stole my comb,

But that’s all right ’till I go home.

She is handsome, she is pretty

She is the belle of Belfast city,

She is courting, one two three

Please won’t you tell me who is she?

 

Albert Mooney says he loves her,

All the boys are fighting for her,

Knock on the door and they ring the bell

Oh my true love, are you well?

Here she comes, as white as snow,

Rings on her fingers and bells on her toes,

Old Johnny Mary she says she’ll die

If she doesn’t get the boy with the roving eye.

 

Tell my ma when I go home,

The boys won’t leave the girls alone,

They pulled my hair and stole my comb,

But that’s all right ’till I go home.

She is handsome, she is pretty

She is the belle of Belfast city,

She is courting, one two three

Please won’t you tell me who is she?

 

Let the wind and the rain and the hail blow high

And the snow come tumbling from the sky

She’s as nice as apple pie

She’ll get her own boy, by and by

When she gets a lad of her own,

She won’t tell her ma ’till she comes home,

Let the boys stay as they will,

For it’s Albert Mooney she loves still.

 

Tell my ma when I go home,

The boys won’t leave the girls alone,

They pulled my hair and stole my comb,

But that’s all right ’till I go home.

She is handsome, she is pretty

She is the belle of Belfast city,

She is courting, one two three

Please won’t you tell me who is she?

 

Tell my ma when I go home,

The boys won’t leave the girls alone,

They pulled my hair and stole my comb,

But that’s all right ’till I go home.

She is handsome, she is pretty

She is the belle of Belfast city,

She is courting, one two three

Please won’t you tell me who is she?

 

Tell my ma when I go home,

The boys won’t leave the girls alone,

They pulled my hair and stole my comb,

But that’s all right ’till I go home.

She is handsome, she is pretty

She is the belle of Belfast city,

She is courting, one two three

Please won’t you tell me who is she?

 

Molly Malone or Cockles & Mussels or In Dublins Fair City mp3

 

Molly Malone or Cockles & Mussels

 

 

1. In Dublin’s fair city,
Where girls are so pretty,
I first set my eyes on sweet Molly Malone,
As she wheeled her wheelbarrow
Through streets broad and narrow,
Crying, “Cockles and mussels, alive, alive oh”!

Chorus:
Alive, alive oh! alive, alive oh!
Crying, “Cockles and mussels, alive, alive oh”!

2. Now she was a fishmonger,
And sure twas no wonder,
For so were her mother and father before,
And they each wheeled their barrow,
Through streets broad and narrow,
Crying, “Cockles and mussels, alive, alive oh”!
Chorus:

3. She died of a fever,
And no one could save her,
And that was the end of sweet Molly Malone.
Now her ghost wheels her barrow,
Through streets broad and narrow,
Crying, “Cockles and mussels, alive, alive oh”!
Chorus:

 

 

 

 

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14/10/08 England, USA and Bavaria – A Grand Triangulation

The Lychen / AMMAS singers are steadily becoming a global force. Eurovision is so yesterday! Introducing the Bob the “Britton” from California, Ulrike with a song from Bavaria and Vida Hedley from… a garden somewhere in the English countryside.

 

I have no information for Ulrike or her song. Can any one help?

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USA & Bavaria

USA + Bavaria streaming MP3 audio & USA + Bavaria wav

Summertime

And the livin’ is easy
Fish are jumpin’
And the cotton is high
Your daddy’s rich
And your mamma’s good lookin’
So hush little baby
Don’t you cry

One of these mornings
You’re going to rise up singing
You’re gonna spread your wings
And take to the sky

But till that morning
There’s a’nothing can harm you
With daddy and mamma standing by

Summertime,
And the livin’ is easy
Fish are jumpin’
And the cotton is high

Your daddy’s rich
And your mamma’s good lookin’
So hush little baby
Don’t you cry

England

An English Country Garden – streaming MP3 & English Country Garden wav

An English Country Garden 

How many kinds of sweet flowers grow
 

 

In an English country garden?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’ll tell you now of some that I know

Those I miss you’ll surely pardon

Daffodils , heart’s ease and flox

Meadowsweet and lady smocks

Gentian, lupin and tall hollihocks

Roses, foxgloves, snowdrops, blue forget-me-nots

In an English country garden

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How many insects come here and go

In an English country garden?

I’ll tell you now of some that I know

Those I miss you’ll surely pardon

Fireflies, moths, gnats and bees

Spiders climbing in the trees

Butterflies drift in the gentle breeze

There are snakes, ants that sting

And other creeping things

In an English country garden

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How many songbirds fly to and fro

In an English country garden?

I’ll tell you now of some that I know

Those I miss you’ll surely pardon

Bobolink, cuckoo and quail

Tanager and cardinal

Bluebird, thrush and nightingale

There is joy in the spring

When the birds begin to sing

In an English country garden.

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09/10/08 Stop Press! A contribution from Austria. Harriet and Pia call to their sweethearts across the Alps. A powerful delivery is essential – especially if it’s going to reach as far as Brighton. No concession to English here. Mmm, yes, but – does anyone have the English translation? PS Keep scrolling down for Graham Fox, France & Frere Jaques. And a little further still for my trip to Irish Alexander School (with a song)

Austria / Osterreich – Bibibe boba (downloadable wav file) + Bibibe boba (streaming mp3)

Bibibe boba

 Bibibe boba bi bibibe bo,

bibibe boba bi bibibe bo

bibibe boba bi bibibe bo

bibibe boba bubi

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08/10/08 It’s official – we are now the standard bearers of traditional culture. And, according to Graham Fox, we are responsible for the “preservation of linguistic diversity”. Apparently even France enters it’s Eurovision songs in English now. Sacre B..! erm, I mean… Shocking! Speaking of which here is Graham leading us in a rousing and powerful Frere Jaques.

Frere Jaques + Frere Jaques-wav downloadable audio file

Frère Jacques, frère Jacques,
Dormez-vous? Dormez-vous?
Sonnez les matines! Sonnez les matines!
Din, dan, don. Din, dan, don.

Richard Brennan kindly invited me to teach Alexander Technique & singing at his training course in Galway last week. I had a truly wonderful time. Here are the students and I singing that beautiful and haunting Irish ballad She Moved Through the Fair.  I’m really hoping to hear a few more songs from that direction. Here is the downloadable version She Moved Through the Fair – wav

She Moved Through the Fair

My young love said to me,
My mother won’t mind
And my father won’t slight you
For your lack of kind”
And she stepped away from me
And this she did say:
It will not be long, love,
Till our wedding day”

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  She stepped away from me
And she moved through the fair
And fondly I watched her
Move here and move there
And then she went homeward
With one star awake
Like the swan in the evening
Moves over the lake

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  The people were saying,
No two e’er were wed
But one had a sorrow
That seldom was said”
And I smiled as she passed by
With her goods and her gear,
And that was the last
That I saw of my dear.

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I dreamed it last night,
That my young love came in
So softly she stepped that
Her feet made no din
And she laid her hand on me
And this she did say
It will not be long, love,
‘Til our wedding day”

 

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26/09/08. Watch out Eurovision – the Lychen International Alexander Singers are snapping at your heels! Two more nuggets of gold – one from Lis representing Denmark and another from Antonio representing Portugal  (with some collaboration from Ulli & Germany).

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The song was “Somos Livres” from Ermelida Duarte
and the words for the short part which we sang was

Uma gaivota voava, voava,
asas de vento,
coração de mar.
Como ela, somos livres,
somos livres de voar.

Uma papoila crescia, crescia,
grito vermelho
num campo qualquer.
Como ela somos livres,
somos livres de crescer.

The complete original words can be found f.i. here. And for for a listening experience of the original *************************************************************

AMMAS members of the world, lend me your ears! Two more vocal gems for your pleasure and delectation! The Aussie and the Kiwi each give us a travelling song from down under.

Glen tells and sings us the true story of Waltzing Matilda

Download 50meg wav file here:-“australia-waltzing-matilda“ – might take a bit of time.

Louise sings No More Double Bunking – does that sound a bit racey or what? You be the judge!

Download 20meg wav file here:- “new-zealand-no-more-double-bunking“ – Everyone sounds in fine voice as usual.

As usual I can be emailed through the link at the bottom of my homepage.

Love,

Alan

Waltzing Matilda

Once a jolly swagman sat beside the billabong,
Under the shade of a coolabah tree,
And he sang as he watched and he waited till his billy boiled
You’ll come a waltzing matilda with me

Waltzing matilda, waltzing matilda
You’ll come a waltzing matilda with me
And he sang as he watched and he waited till his billy boiled
You’ll come a waltzing matilda with me.

Down came a jumbuck to drink beside the billabong
Up jumped the swagman and seized him with glee
And he sang as he tucked jumbuck in his tucker-bag
You’ll come a waltzing matilda with me

Waltzing matilda, waltzing matilda
You’ll come a waltzing matilda with me
And he sang as he watched and he waited till his billy boiled
You’ll come a waltzing matilda with me.

Down came the stockman, riding on his thoroughbred,
Down came the troopers, one, two, three.
“Where’s the jolly jumbuck you’ve got in your tucker-bag?
You’ll come a waltzing matilda with me

Waltzing matilda, waltzing matilda
You’ll come a waltzing matilda with me
And he sang as he watched and he waited till his billy boiled
You’ll come a waltzing matilda with me.

Up jumped the swagman and plunged into the billabong,
“You’ll never catch me alive,” cried he
And his ghost may be heard as you ride beside the billabong,
You’ll come a waltzing matilda with me.

http://www.glennbswift.com/alexander/about.html

No More Double-Bunking

I heard this sad song-oh
In the Orongorongo:
“There’ll be no more double-bunking, double-bunking for me.”
I said to the vocalist,
“Oh, why do you so insist,
‘There’ll be no more double-bunking, double-bunking for me’?”

There’ll be no more double-bunking,
Double-bunking, double-bunking.
No more double-bunking, double-bunking for me.

He said, “I’ve had a gutsful
Of tramps where the hut’s full.
There’ll be no more double-bunking, double-bunking for me.
I’ve weakened and lost weight.
I’m nervously prostrate.
There’ll be no more double-bunking, double-bunking for me.”

My tongue’s covered with fur too,
And I can’t eat my burgoo.
There’ll be no more double-bunking, double-bunking for me
I’m washed out like a dish rag,
And, I’ve ruptured my sleeping bag.
There’ll be no more double-bunking, double-bunking for me.

http://www.alexandertechnique.org.nz/teachers.html

email – louisegauld@xtra.co.nz

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Dear AMMAS members,

Here is the next vocal offering! It’s one of the German songs taught to us by Petra – introduction; demo; the group sings in unison; two part canon; four part canon – all done with movements! If somebody can send the song title and text I’ll put them up here as soon as possible. I can’t tell you what a pleasure it has been listening to all the songs – it’s brought so many happy memories streaming back.

germany-1

You can email me through the link at the bottom of my homepage.

Best wishes,

Alan

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For the AMMAS members who attended our annual gathering in Lychen 2008. This year we had a continuing theme of songs from all the countries represented at the gathering. Jamie MacDowell (Britain, Northern Ireland) took us through a Welsh song inspired by Dylan Thomas. Hover over the link & a window should come up. Click on the “play” button and you should get streaming audio… lychen-chorus-02-master1

Jamie photo

Not bad for 20 minutes rehearsal – even if I do say so myself!

The photos are by Ralf Hiemisch – Alexander teacher & photographer.

The words are below. I’ll get more of the songs up as I get to grips with the technology. Enjoy!

Best wishes,

Alan

Every morning, when I wake,
Dear Lord, a little prayer I make,
O please to keep Thy loving eye
On all poor creatures born to die.

And every evening at sun-down
I ask a blessing on the town,
For whether we last the night or no
I’m sure is always touch-and-go.

We are not wholly bad or good
Who live our lives under Milk Wood,
And Thou, I know, wilt be the first
To see our best side, not our worst.

O let us see another day!
Bless us this holy night, I pray,
And to the sun we all will bow
And say, goodbye – but just for now!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Yellow’s on the Broom

February 17, 2008

We can become so habituated to living in restrictive little tunnels of space and time. Think, for example, of the morning’s headlong rush to work. Sometimes, however, it’s just that little bit easier to step out of the restriction.

The South of England has been saturated in sunshine during the past week. A cold, glorious February. Driving through our beautiful hills, the South Downs, I noticed that the Gorse bushes were in their yellow glory. The rolling Downs were expansive and ecstatic.

It reminded me of a beautiful song by Adam McNaughton about the Scottish travelling folk called “the Yellow’s on the Broom” .

The narrator in the song recounts the travelling folks miseries when they forced to live a Scaldie’s (settled house-dweller) life during the winter months. The narrator looks forward keenly to the springtime when the “gan aboot folk” can take the road once more and live in the “worlds room”. For the narrator the world’s room is synonymous with liberation, belonging and being in charge of ones fate.

Try it sometime. Instead of living in a fragmented, compartmentalised world just wake up to the one infinite room that we all inhabit. Just for a moment… expand into the space around you. It can be a bit scary. but it can also be exciting.

You can download a short mp3 clip of Adam MacNaughton singing the “Yellow on the Broom” by following this link to Coda Music.

And here are the lyrics as I recall them:

YELLOW ON THE BROOM

I ken ye dinna like it lass, tae winter here in toon.
The scaldies (settled/town folk) aye miscry us and try to put us doon
And it’s hard to raise three bairns in a single flea-box room
But I’ll tak ye on the road again, when yellow’s on the broom.

CHORUS: When yellow’s on the broom x 2
I’ll tak ye on the road again (last line of verse)
When yellow’s on the broom.

The scaldies cry us “tinker dirt” and sconce oor bairns in school
But who cares what a scaldy thinks, for a scaldy’s but a fool.
They never heard the yorlin’s lark nor see the flax in bloom
For they’re aye cooped up in hooses, when yellow’s on the broom.

Nae sales for pegs or baskets noo, so just tae stay alive
We’ve had tae tak on scaldy jobs from eight o’clock til five.
But we call nae man oor master for we own the worlds room
And we’ll bid farewell tae Brechin when yellow’s on the broom.

I’m weary for the springtime when we tak the road ance mair
Tae the plantin’ and the pearlin’ and the berry fields o’ Blair
We’ll meet up wi’ oor kinfolk frae a’ the country roon
When the gan aboot folks tak the road, when yellow’s on the broom.